Monday, December 12, 2011

Crossing bridges...

I've just come home from a week-long "bridge" holiday, visiting my in-laws in Cáceres, and it's high time I got a new post out.  For those of you who haven't heard of the Spanish concept of holiday "bridges", you might want to check out this post on Erik's blog, where he explains it quite well (with pictures of Super Mario thrown in for good measure).

I didn't take a lot of photos of Cáceres this time around, but I did get a few on a foggy night that turned out to be quite interesting.

The Professor and SAM at an outdoor Rodin exhibit in the Main square....the fog made the sculptures just a tiny bit creepy.

"The Thinker"...I'm guessing he's thinking he'd like to be on a nice warm tropical beach somewhere instead of sitting in the middle of the fog. ;)

Eerie little street in the old part of town.


I know, they're not the best photos, but they give you an idea of what Cáceres looks like on a foggy night...and, although it might sound silly, it actually makes it easier for me to imagine what it might have been like to live there hundreds of years ago (cold, damp, and generally unappealing...thank heavens for modern day heating). If you want to see more photos of what it looks like in the daytime, have a look at this post, or better yet, go visit.  Cáceres is one of those places that get skipped over by tourists, in favor of other more well-known places, but it is really a lovely city, with an amazingly well-preserved historical center that makes it worth spending a few days soaking up its medieval charm.  It's usually not terribly overrun with tourists, even during major holidays, so it's one of those last minute holiday options you might want to check out if you're looking for a different sort of place to visit.

Anyway, that bridge has been crossed.  I'm back from Cáceres, and the first thing I found when I got home was this in my mailbox:


Yes, it's my very own signed copy of Mercury Rises, the long-awaited sequel to Robert Kroese's Mercury Falls.  The apocalypse didn't turn out so well the first time around, so it looks like the forces from above are giving it another try.  Will they succeed, or will Christine and Mercury thwart their plans once more?  Looks like we'll just have to read it to find out.  So far I've read the first few chapters, and it promises to be every bit as hilarious and irreverent as the first book, just the way I like it...and now I just hope the world won't come to an end before I finish it.

7 comments:

  1. Estoy alucinando con lo grande que se le ve a tu niña.

    ME alegro que disfrutaras del "puente" :)
    Nosotros malitos, todos menos Ro y Ryu con neumonía.

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  2. gozi: Pues, si llegas a ver a la mayor... ;D

    Que rollo lo de estar malos todos, espero que os pongáis bien pronto!

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  3. Okay, the professor really is just too cute. I totally agree that the atmosphere of the photos takes us back in time. LOVE that feeling.

    Here you have Rob's second MERCURY in your hands just as he's printing drafts of #3! You can enjoy #2 and already prep for #3!

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  4. Wonderful photos! They are very atmospheric (literally!).

    I think Mercury Falls and Mercury Rises are available through the Amazon Kindle Lending Library. I will have to check them out, since you recommend them. Just one more title to add to my (incredibly long) list of books I want to read ...

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  5. Jocelyn: I told the professor you said he's cute, and he was pleased as punch!. :D I'm really enjoying the second book, it's every bit as good as the first one, and I will be ready for number 3 as soon as it's out.

    Bud: You really should read them, they are downright hilarious...they remind me a lot of a mix between Douglas Adams and Terry Pratchett.

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  6. I think those photos are great! And no, it doesn't sound silly to say it helps you to imagine what the town might have looked like in days gone by. I've often thought the same - especially in Italy in those medieval hill towns with their tall, shuttered buildings and narrow streets. Fog and dark and dim lighting really are very atmospheric and evocative!

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  7. I must give those books a go I've heard about them from so many people. Caceres on a foggy night looks how our little apartment in Tarifa's casco antiguo feels - humido!

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